A Lookery at “Leaving Berlin” by Joseph Kanon

leaving-berlin

Leaving Berlin by Joseph Kanon
Atria (Simon and Schuster)
March 3, 2015
384 pages

Alex Stein, a German Jew who escaped Nazi Germany to America with the help of close family friends, is now going back to Russian-occupied Berlin, leaving behind his son Peter, and his estranged wife, Marjorie. Stein is a victim of McCarthyism, refusing to inform on his friends who may have Communist sympathies. Singled out because of his membership in the Party prior to World War II, Stein is forced to leave the United States for being in contempt of the Congressional committee.

Alex is asked by the precursor to the CIA to “keep his eyes open” while in Berlin; the incentive to comply with this request being the possibility of returning to the U.S. and his family.

Such is the premise of Joseph Kanon’s latest espionage thriller Leaving Berlin.

But immediately on arrival in the divided city, Alex’s singular contact with the U.S. government is killed, and he is left adrift without support from his adopted homeland. He is welcomed by the German Kulturbund, which is recruiting previously exiled artists to create a new artistic community in the Russian sector of Berlin. There he meets old friends — actors, directors, playwrights, poets, authors and of course, Irene, an old flame who is part of the family that helped him escape to the U.S. fifteen years ago.

But there is no free ride in the new Germany, under Russian control in the East. Before long, Stein is asked to inform on certain members of the Kulturbund and is unwittingly tricked into reporting on friends’ activities and conversations. At the same time, the U.S. makes contact with their green asset and pumps Alex for kernels of information on Russian and German actions only whispered about in the West.

Alex becomes involved with hiding Erich, an extremely ill escaped political prisoner. Friend and family ties are tested in the efforts to heal and hide the young man. When Stein makes arrangements to get his friend to the safety in the West, all hell breaks loose.

It is at this point that Joseph Kanon’s expertise at plot twists involving betrayals and secrets becomes evident. His characters don’t know who to trust and the tension and their fear is palpable on the page. Leaving Berlin is an excellent look at the emerging Communist society of what will become East Berlin.

The Berlin Airlift, the appalling rubble and ruin towering everywhere one looks and the confusion and fear of average citizens (even those who support Communism) is reported faithfully by author Kanon.

An insightful look into the fledgling East German Communist society, Joseph Kanon’s Leaving Berlin is a tension-filled exciting page-turner. Recommended for fans of the early days of the Cold War and post WWII espionage and politics.

Leaving Berlin by Joseph Kanon is courtesy of the publisher Atria (Simon and Schuster) and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.